The Bible is not only clear itself; it is clarifying, which means that we see other things clearly by its light. What things do we see clearly? We looked at the first item yesterday, which is the way we should go. Today we continue with three other answers to the question. 

This fourteenth stanza speaks of the clarity of the Word of God, then. But the Bible is not only clear itself; it is clarifying, which means that we see other things clearly by its light. What things do we see? The writer answers: 1) the way we should go (v. 105); 2) righteous behavior (v. 106); 3) suffering (v. 107); 4) right worship (v. 108); 5) the dangers of this life (v. 109); 6) enemies (v. 110); and 7) our heritage (v. 111). Therefore, he says, “My heart is set on keeping your decrees to the very end” (v. 112). 

The nighttime journeys of Israel through the wilderness were illumined by a pillar of fire that moved before them on their march. Most of the time the pillar stood in the center of their camp over the Most Holy Place of the tabernacle where during the day it was a pillar of cloud. But when they marched it went before them to lead the way, and at night it also illumined their path by becoming a flaming pillar of light (see Exod. 40:36-38). In a similar way our nighttime passage through the dark and dangerous journey of this life is illumined by God's Word, the Bible.

What does it mean to think of the Bible as sweet? One place we might start in trying to get some understanding is by noting that what the psalmist says is sweet are the “promises” or “sayings” of God. 

Yet there is a sense in which the psalmist says that is exactly what he finds when he studies Scripture. It takes him back to Eden, not in an unfallen state to be sure, but to a place where he is himself personally taught of God. And what this means for us is that, although we have forfeited Eden, we have a taste of Eden or, better yet, of heaven, when we come to the Bible and find that God himself speaks to us.