Charles Spurgeon wrote that the theme of the psalm is “thanksgiving and the motives for it.”1 That is well said, for thanksgiving is the note struck in the opening verses (vv. 1-3) as well as in the refrain of verses 8-9, 15-16, 21-22 and 31-32.

It may seem strange to anyone who knows anything about the English Puritans to speak of Psalm 107 as “The Pilgrims' Psalm,” not because they did not know, frequently read and greatly cherish it, but because, being people of the Book, they loved and cherished the other psalms, too. In fact, they cherished the entire Bible.

When we come to the last section of this psalm, after the historical review of Israel's unfaithfulness to God, we are told of God’s response to the people’s sin (vv. 40-46). It was twofold. First, there was judgment. Judgment we expect. We are told that God was angry with his people and therefore "handed them over to the nations” so that "their foes ruled over them" and "their enemies oppressed them” (vv. 40–42). This was the actual history of the people once they entered the Promised Land. They sinned by compromising with the values of the nations around them. 

In today's study we continue our look at rebellion, the sin identified with the people's exodus from Egypt, and the root sin that lies at the heart of the other sins of Israel. The psalmist catalogues six sins associated with Israel's years of wandering in the wilderness, and then follows them with one more from the years in Canaan. We looked at the first three yesterday and continue with the rest today.

Rebellion, the sin identified with the people's exodus from Egypt, is a root sin that lies at the heart of the other sins of Israel. Still each sin is worth remembering separately, which is what the psalmist does at this point. He remembers six sins associated with Israel's years of wandering in the wilderness, and then follows them with one more from the years in Canaan. We will look at the first three sins of Israel in today's study.